SOLD OUT: NEEDTOBREATHE presents TOUR DE COMPADRES featuring NEEDTOBREATHE, SWITCHFOOT, DREW HOLCOMB & THE NEIGHBORS and COLONY HOUSE – Tickets – Oregon Zoo – Portland, OR – July 17th, 2015

SOLD OUT: NEEDTOBREATHE presents TOUR DE COMPADRES featuring NEEDTOBREATHE, SWITCHFOOT, DREW HOLCOMB & THE NEIGHBORS and COLONY HOUSE

Oregon Zoo Summer Concert Series

SOLD OUT: NEEDTOBREATHE presents TOUR DE COMPADRES featuring NEEDTOBREATHE, SWITCHFOOT, DREW HOLCOMB & THE NEIGHBORS and COLONY HOUSE

Friday, July 17, 2015

Doors: 5:00 pm / Show: 6:00 pm

$35.00 - $95.00

Sold Out

This event is all ages

No outside food or beverage.
Only sealed water bottles permitted.
Rain or shine.
Valid for zoo admission day of show only.
No Refunds.

NEEDTOBREATHE
NEEDTOBREATHE
NEEDTOBREATHE is a GRAMMY-nominated, American Rock 'n' Roll Band from South Carolina, effortlessly woven from the musical traditions and faith of their upbringing in the Deep South of the United States. Made up of brothers Bear Rinehart (vocals, guitar) and Bo Rinehart (guitar, vocals), Seth Bolt (bass, vocals) and Josh Lovelace (keys, vocals), the band hit their big break in 2005
when they signed to Atlantic/Lava/Word Records. The career to follow would include four full studio albums, chart-topping cross-genre success, multiple headlining tours and media coverage on CONAN, The Ellen Degeneres Show,

The Tonight Show with Jay Leno, Late Night with Jimmy Fallon, Late Show with David Letterman, CBS, MTV, FOX and much more. The band's critically acclaimed fifth studio album, Rivers In the Wasteland was released on April 15, 2014, and debuted at #3 on the Billboard Top 200 Chart.
Switchfoot
Switchfoot
SWITCHFOOT

Jon Foreman (vocals/guitar) / Tim Foreman (bass) / Chad Butler (drums) / Jerome Fontamillas (keyboard/guitar) / Drew Shirley (guitar)

As they enter their 17th year as a band, Switchfoot has achieved a level of success that brothers Jon and Tim Foreman and their high-school friend Chad Butler never anticipated when forming the band in San Diego in 1996. The SoCal natives have sold 5.5 million copies worldwide of their eight studio albums (including their 2003 double-platinum breakthrough The Beautiful Letdown and 2009's Grammy Award-winning Hello Hurricane), racked up a string of Alternative radio hit singles ("Meant to Live," "Dare You To Move," "Mess of Me," "The Sound (John M. Perkins' Blues)," "Dark Horses," and "Afterlife"), performed sold-out world tours (visiting five continents in the past year alone), raised hundreds of thousands of dollars to aid homeless kids in their community through their own Bro-Am Foundation, and earned themselves a global fan base devoted to Switchfoot's emotionally intelligent and uplifting brand of alternative rock.

So when it came time to write the songs that would make up their ninth studio album, the members of Switchfoot were looking for a challenge. "The point became, 'What are we going to do to push ourselves,'" Jon recalls. "Could we take ourselves somewhere we'd never been before, yet achieve a feeling of comfort at the same time? How do we go to a new place that feels like home?"

Switchfoot found the answers on the road and in the waves. A year ago, while touring in support of their 2011 album Vice Verses, the long-time surfers set out in search of inspiration by visiting several of their favorite surf breaks around the world. "The idea was to surf, write songs, play music, and see what ideas came," says Tim. The band traveled to Jeffreys Bay and Crayfish Factory in South Africa, Bronte Beach in Australia, Raglan in New Zealand, and Uluwatu in Bali, and chronicled their physical and emotional journey, as well as their unshakeable brotherly bond, in Fading West — a documentary film that features stunning locales, revealing interviews, jubilant live footage, and glimpses of Switchfoot at home and in their studio in San Diego. Like Rattle and Hum meets Endless Summer, the movie is part travelogue, part surf film, and part behind-the-scenes look at the making of the band's upcoming new album, which will also be entitled Fading West.

Not surprisingly, the album, which finds Switchfoot returning to the melodic pop sensibility of their early years, was inspired by the sea, which Jon describes as a perfect metaphor for simultaneously experiencing comfort and danger. "You're comfortable out there, but it's the unknown," he says. "You can paddle out in South Africa and it's exactly like home and nothing like home all at once. That's what I'm hoping our record feels like — trying to find peace in dangerous places."

There's a memorable scene in Fading West where the band members are paddling out at Uluwatu with their friend, surf champ Rob Machado. Jon says he had a major epiphany that day. "As I sat on my board in the Indian Ocean, I realized that these waves could eventually make it back to my home of San Diego thousands of miles away," he says. "That rhythm and pulse was really grounding and inspiring on so many levels. It made me grasp the dichotomy between the pull of the road and the pull toward getting back home. It's like we had to leave home to find home. For a long time, home was a place of failure because it meant that we didn't have any shows," Jon adds. "When you drop out of college in your early '20s and all your friends are getting jobs and you're the guy who lives with his parents, it's way better to be on the road. Only recently did I feel like home was a place where I could feel comfortable and content."

Switchfoot traces its roots to the beaches of San Diego when the Foremans and Butler connected as surfers (Jerome Fontamillas joined in September 2000 and Drew Shirley in 2005). Though they competed in national surf championships on weekends, their real bond came from a common love of music. They decided to form a band, chose the name Switchfoot (a surfing term), put themselves through months of sweaty rehearsals in their garage, and then hit the road. After just 20 gigs, Switchfoot signed with re:Think Records and released three albums, The Legend of Chin (1997), New Way To Be Human (1999), and the gold-certified Learning to Breathe (2000), before signing with Columbia Records, which released their fourth album, The Beautiful Letdown, on its Red/Ink subsidiary, upping the band to Columbia proper after the album sold more than a million copies. (It eventually sold 2.6 million.) The band released two more albums with Sony, 2005's Nothing Is Sound, which debuted at No. 3 on the Billboard album chart, and 2006's Oh! Gravity., which climbed to No. 1 on the iTunes Album chart, before going their separate ways with the company.

Itching for creative freedom, Switchfoot financed the building of its own studio where they recorded their seventh album, the hard-hitting Hello Hurricane, and its groove-oriented follow-up Vice Verses, both of which they released on their own lowercase people records via Atlantic Records. (Jon also released four solo EPs and a debut album with Fiction Family, his side project with Nickel Creek's Sean Watkins.)

Along the way, Switchfoot have been steadfast in their commitment to giving back by supporting various humanitarian causes, such as DATA, the ONE Campaign, Habitat for Humanity, Invisible Children, and To Write Love on Her Arms. In 2005, the band held its first annual Bro-Am, a day-long event that includes a surf contest, live concert on the beach, charity auction, and after-party at local tavern Belly Up. Now in its ninth year, the Bro-Am has raised more than $715,000 to benefit local children's charities that aid at-risk, homeless, and street kids in San Diego. "We've got a really young fan base and some of the kids who come to our shows are homeless," Tim says. "You'd never know it, but they are. I think we've always been drawn to the underdog, and I can't think of a bigger underdog than a kid who's fighting for his life at the age of 12."

Switchfoot premiered Fading West on opening night of the 2013 Summer X-Games in August. (The band have been very active in the action sports world, having performed at numerous NFL and MLB post-game events, as well as at the US Open of Surfing in 2011.) They will spend the fall on a unique tour, with the film serving as the opening act to a more intimate, stripped down performance from the band. The film will be released digitally towards the end of 2013, with the new album seeing it's release on January 14, 2014.

We weren't chasing anything in particular when we started the band," Jon says in the film. "We simply had these songs that we loved playing. It's that joy that fueled us and it's that joy that has kept us going and brought us to here."

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Drew Holcomb & The Neighbors
Drew Holcomb & The Neighbors
The night we played Bonnaroo a couple years ago, I sat with my younger brother Sam, my wife Ellie, and a few other dear friends, reclining in plastic lawn chairs in the midnight Tennessee heat outside our tour bus, drinking wine and listening to music. After a decade of touring, (over 1700 shows) and making records, it's easy to forget the magic of music. We took turns introducing each other to new bands and artists, talking about our lives, our dreams, our failures.
Music has always had a medicinal quality to me, and that's why I started writing songs and touring in the first place. I first needed the medicine when I was seventeen. I lost a brother that summer, 1999. He was a great kid, lived life from the view of a wheelchair, and was gone without warning a few days before his 14th birthday. I took lots of medicine that summer, from Radiohead and Bob Dylan, from Pearl Jam and Otis Redding, from Bob Marley to the Temptations, Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers to Rage Against the Machine. I played the guitar in my bedroom, learned songs I loved, sang along in my car alone or with a friend.
A year later I went to college and I became an addict. I was introduced to the medicine of Patty Griffin, Whiskeytown, Springsteen, Tom Waits, the Jayhawks, Wilco, Beck and hundreds more that could fill pages. I went and saw their shows and played their records over and over and over. The honesty, the intellect, the stories, the raw emotion, the rhythm, the vulnerability; it all made me feel like I was not alone. Music was a way of saying, "me too," a way of finding hope and meaning in the sorrow and confusion of life.
Somewhere in those late college years, I started writing songs, at first feeble attempts, but it grew and grew, and I got better and better. I booked shows, I made myself vulnerable and stood onstage and sang earnest songs about love and joy, pain and tragedy. I convinced myself that making medicine was something I could take a swing at. After graduating, over a cup of coffee, I asked my dentist father what he thought about my dream, and he asked me one question,
"Son, are you going to work hard at that?"
"Yes sir." I replied.
"Well let's go to the guitar shop and I'll buy you the best one I can afford."
I hit the road, and I hit it hard. I found a band of agile, competent musicians whose musical library is vast and deep and demanding. Along the way, I married the girl I always wanted. She quit her teaching job and joined the band, toured with us for seven great years. We started making records, and spent the majority of the last decade on the road. You may have heard our music on TV. We've had our songs on dozens of TV shows like Nashville, Parenthood, How I Met Your Mother. We have toured with artists like the Avett Brothers, John Hiatt, Needtobreathe, and a host of other kindred souls. We have sold out our own shows in places from Chicago to Austin, LA to New York, London to Denver, on stages we never dreamed we would play, and selling over 100,000 records in the process, all while staying independent. Our music is simple and heartfelt, built to inhabit people's day to day lives, like so many of the records I have loved over the long haul in my own life.

Medicine is by far the best music we have ever made. When I played it for a respected friend, I asked, "What do you think?" The response was,
"It sounds like it's always been there."
We recorded the whole album in eight days, co-produced by the band and Joe Pisapia (Ben Folds, KD Lang, Guster, Josh Rouse) at Joe's Middletree Studios, in East Nashville. We recorded one song at a time, until it was finished. No studio tricks, just me and a great band working together, creating, having fun, embracing the sorrow. It's always been about the song for us, a community of musicians surrounding that song and bringing it life, trying to make it sound like it has always been there.
The twelve songs on Medicine deal with loyalty, hardship, marriage, friendship, feeling like an outsider, and wrestling with God. "You'll Always Be My Girl" is a love song to my bride Ellie, who after eight years on the road with us, is stepping away from the band. I came up with the first line when I was playing with our daughter Emmylou before putting her to bed. I wasn't trying to write a song, just entertaining her and I came up with the first line – 'from the start of spring to the autumn leaves, and the summers and winters between…" After tucking her in, I dashed off the rest of the song in 45 minutes. It was the night before we went into the studio for the last time. When Ellie got home, I played it for her. She loved it, and we cried together for a moment and celebrated what we've got and what we're grateful for.
The next day, I taught it to the band, and we recorded the 24-hour-old song in one take. Nathan Dugger on piano, Rich Brinsfield on upright bass and me singing, just sitting in a circle, one take. That ethos embodies the whole experience of making this record.
"Shine Like Lightning" is a song about us being an underdog band, never embraced by the powers of radio, major labels, large corporate sponsorships, and in light of that we have a healthy chip on our shoulder. But our music making has brought us, and our fans, a lot of happiness it seems. This is an ode to ten years of doing it our own way, on our own terms, in spite of the roadblocks of cynicism and criticism, those who would "take something beautiful and make it feel small." It's an anthem for our band and our fans, that we are going to "Shine Like Lightning!" critics and cynics be damned.
Breaking with my previous autobiographical songwriting bent, I wrote songs like "Heartbreak Changes Everything" and "Sister Brothers," based on the experiences of friends instead. Elsewhere, "American Beauty" looks back on a memorable teenage romance. The grooving, call-and-response "Here We Go" was inspired by that particular night shared with friends at Bonnaroo.
Medicine closes with "When It's All Said and Done." It's about questioning whether God is real and whether he cares about us or not … and not walking away from that, but holding on to it like you're hanging on to the side of a cliff, and that's where I find myself at this point.
More than anything else, Medicine is born out of the stories we are told.
The email from a fan who was on the verge on suicide but our song gave her glimmer of hope to keep hanging on. The story by the bus of fans who danced their first dance to another one of our songs. The mom who sings our music to her kids before they go to sleep, begging for peace and health and a happy life. The people who dance in the back of the rock club and have a moment of joy in a world of suffering. We only hope to add to the soundtrack, in the same way that all those artists and bands have done for me.
Making medicine,
Music, it makes you feel good, makes you feel understood
like you're not alone, not a rolling stone, you're not the only one on the road.
Colony House
Colony House
Colony House, a trio from Nashville, TN will release their first full-length album When I Was Younger via Descendant Records (The Lone Bellow) on July 22, 2014. Lead singer, guitarist and principal songwriter Caleb Chapman writes effortlessly infectious tunes that resonate with personal experience and emotional depth. The songs' messages of hope and perseverance are matched by the organic musical rapport of Caleb and his bandmates, brother Will Chapman on drums and Scott Mills on lead guitar and harmony vocals. The openhearted attitude reflected throughout When I Was Younger can be seen in both Caleb's expressive vocals and in the band's vivid performances of such personally-charged tunes as "Silhouettes," "Second Guessing Games," "Keep On Keeping On," "Waiting for My Time to Come" and "Won't Give Up.” Colony House delivers the material with a balance of craft and immediacy that deliver a rich, gritty rock edge with heavy guitars and textual layers.